top of page

ETHOS Broomall Adolescent IOP (Mon/Wed/Fri)

Public·6 coworkers
Justin Corleone
Justin Corleone

How To Create C Library File



This step-by-step walkthrough shows how to use the Visual Studio IDE to create your own dynamic link library (DLL) written in Microsoft C++ (MSVC). Then it shows how to use the DLL from another C++ app. DLLs (also known as shared libraries in UNIX-based operating systems) are one of the most useful kinds of Windows components. You can use them as a way to share code and resources, and to shrink the size of your apps. DLLs can even make it easier to service and extend your apps.




how to create c library file



In this walkthrough, you'll create a DLL that implements some math functions. Then you'll create a console app that uses the functions from the DLL. You'll also get an introduction to some of the programming techniques and conventions used in Windows DLLs.


Like a statically linked library, a DLL exports variables, functions, and resources by name. A client app imports the names to use those variables, functions, and resources. Unlike a statically linked library, Windows connects the imports in your app to the exports in a DLL at load time or at run time, instead of connecting them at link time. Windows requires extra information that isn't part of the standard C++ compilation model to make these connections. The MSVC compiler implements some Microsoft-specific extensions to C++ to provide this extra information. We explain these extensions as we go.


This walkthrough creates two Visual Studio solutions; one that builds the DLL, and one that builds the client app. The DLL uses the C calling convention. It can be called from apps written in other programming languages, as long as the platform, calling conventions, and linking conventions match. The client app uses implicit linking, where Windows links the app to the DLL at load-time. This linking lets the app call the DLL-supplied functions just like the functions in a statically linked library.


This walkthrough doesn't cover some common situations. The code doesn't show the use of C++ DLLs by other programming languages. It doesn't show how to create a resource-only DLL, or how to use explicit linking to load DLLs at run-time rather than at load-time. Rest assured, you can use MSVC and Visual Studio to do all these things.


For links to more information about DLLs, see Create C/C++ DLLs in Visual Studio. For more information about implicit linking and explicit linking, see Determine which linking method to use. For information about creating C++ DLLs for use with programming languages that use C-language linkage conventions, see Exporting C++ functions for use in C-language executables. For information about how to create DLLs for use with .NET languages, see Calling DLL Functions from Visual Basic Applications.


In this set of tasks, you create a project for your DLL, add code, and build it. To begin, start the Visual Studio IDE, and sign in if you need to. The instructions vary slightly depending on which version of Visual Studio you're using. Make sure you have the correct version selected in the control in the upper left of this page.


In the Add New Item dialog box, in the left pane, select Visual C++. In the center pane, select Header File (.h). Specify MathLibrary.h as the name for the header file.


Notice the preprocessor statements at the top of the file. The new project template for a DLL project adds _EXPORTS to the defined preprocessor macros. In this example, Visual Studio defines MATHLIBRARY_EXPORTS when your MathLibrary DLL project is built.


When the MATHLIBRARY_EXPORTS macro is defined, the MATHLIBRARY_API macro sets the __declspec(dllexport) modifier on the function declarations. This modifier tells the compiler and linker to export a function or variable from the DLL for use by other applications. When MATHLIBRARY_EXPORTS is undefined, for example, when the header file is included by a client application, MATHLIBRARY_API applies the __declspec(dllimport) modifier to the declarations. This modifier optimizes the import of the function or variable in an application. For more information, see dllexport, dllimport.


In Solution Explorer, right-click on the Source Files node and choose Add > New Item. Create a new .cpp file called MathLibrary.cpp, in the same way that you added a new header file in the previous step.


To verify that everything works so far, compile the dynamic link library. To compile, choose Build > Build Solution on the menu bar. The DLL and related compiler output are placed in a folder called Debug directly below the solution folder. If you create a Release build, the output is placed in a folder called Release. The output should look something like this:


When you create a DLL, think about how client apps may use it. To call the functions or access the data exported by a DLL, client source code must have the declarations available at compile time. At link time, the linker requires information to resolve the function calls or data accesses. A DLL supplies this information in an import library, a file that contains information about how to find the functions and data, instead of the actual code. And at run time, the DLL must be available to the client, in a location that the operating system can find.


Whether it's your own or from a third-party, your client app project needs several pieces of information to use a DLL. It needs to find the headers that declare the DLL exports, the import libraries for the linker, and the DLL itself. One solution is to copy all of these files into your client project. For third-party DLLs that are unlikely to change while your client is in development, this method may be the best way to use them. However, when you also build the DLL, it's better to avoid duplication. If you make a local copy of DLL files that are under development, you may accidentally change a header file in one copy but not the other, or use an out-of-date library.


To avoid out-of-sync code, we recommend you set the include path in your client project to include the DLL header files directly from your DLL project. Also, set the library path in your client project to include the DLL import libraries from the DLL project. And finally, copy the built DLL from the DLL project into your client build output directory. This step allows your client app to use the same DLL code you build.


A minimal console application project is created for you. The name for the main source file is the same as the project name that you entered earlier. In this example, it's named MathClient.cpp. You can build it, but it doesn't use your DLL yet.


When the wizard finishes, a minimal console application project is created for you. The name for the main source file is the same as the project name that you entered earlier. In this example, it's named MathClient.cpp. You can build it, but it doesn't use your DLL yet.


Next, to call the MathLibrary functions in your source code, your project must include the MathLibrary.h file. You could copy this header file into your client app project, then add it to the project as an existing item. This method can be a good choice for third-party libraries. However, if you're working on the code for your DLL and your client at the same time, the header files could get out of sync. To avoid this issue, set the Additional Include Directories path in your project to include the path to the original header.


You can also enter a relative path from your client source files to the folder that contains the DLL header files. If you followed the directions to put your client project in a separate solution from the DLL, the relative path should look like this:


After you've entered the path to the header file in the Additional Include Directories dialog box, choose the OK button. In the Property Pages dialog box, choose the OK button to save your changes.


This code can be compiled, but not linked. If you build the client app now, the error list shows several LNK2019 errors. That's because your project is missing some information: You haven't specified that your project has a dependency on the MathLibrary.lib library yet. And, you haven't told the linker how to find the MathLibrary.lib file.


To fix this issue, you could copy the library file directly into your client app project. The linker would find and use it automatically. However, if both the library and the client app are under development, that might lead to changes in one copy that aren't shown in the other. To avoid this issue, you can set the Additional Dependencies property to tell the build system that your project depends on MathLibrary.lib. And, you can set an Additional Library Directories path in your project to include the path to the original library when you link.


Double-click in the top pane of the Additional Library Directories dialog box to enable an edit control. In the edit control, specify the path to the location of the MathLibrary.lib file. By default, it's in a folder called Debug directly under the DLL solution folder. If you create a release build, the file is placed in a folder called Release. You can use the $(IntDir) macro so that the linker can find your DLL, no matter which kind of build you create. If you followed the directions to put your client project in a separate solution from the DLL project, the relative path should look like this:


Once you've entered the path to the library file in the Additional Library Directories dialog box, choose the OK button to go back to the Property Pages dialog box. Choose OK to save the property changes.


About

Description: The group is a Mental Health and Substance Abu...

Coworkers

  • pagpsgroup
  • Alex Sterba
    Alex Sterba
  • Silas Kelly
    Silas Kelly
  • Charles Miller
    Charles Miller
  • Justin Corleone
    Justin Corleone
bottom of page